Electric Cartilage And The Games That Don't Exist

Te Occidere Possunt Sed Te Edere Non Possunt Nefas Est

“Your people require more maggot lollipops.” An unknown inspiration for Destiny.

What most people don’t realize, because Bungie has been very tight lipped about this, is that the Hive take a great deal of inspiration from a little known 1999 real time strategy/city building game called “Alien Nations”, by German Developer JoWooD Productions.

In Alien Nations you could select to play one of three alien species: the blue Pimmons, the large breasted and scantily clad Amazons (WTF???), and the insectoid Sajkhi.

alien nations race screen

It is the last of these that was the direct inspiration for Destiny’s Hive. Not only are the Sajkhi insects, like the Hive, but the Sajkhi also farm maggots which are their primary food source. It was the maggot farming that was the direct inspiration for the Hive’s worm narrative in Destiny:

alien nations sajkhi maggot

The Sajkhi also had a “Hall of Orgies” (WTF???) as their recreation building, so expect that to definitely be a Raid in the next Destiny expansion.

Dear Readers! Post in the comments if you’d like to join me in starting a kickstarter campaign for the world’s first Hall of Orgies! Wouldn’t all our lives be a little better if there was a Hall of Orgies in every city? Well, this kickstarter campaign is how we make that dream a reality. Post in the comments!

Finding Destiny’s hidden lore through concept art: the Truth of the Hive

oryx concept

I think that some aspects of Destiny’s lore that have yet to be revealed about the Hive can actually be guessed at by looking at some very old concept art from early in Destiny’s development.

TL;DR: There’s a “Conclusions and Theories” section all the way at the bottom of the page which sums everything up.

There’s some holes and loose ends to my theories, so let me know your own thoughts.

EARLY CONCEPTS

I was looking at this Hive concept art by Daniel Chavez, which I found at the two following links:
http://conceptartworld.com/?p=36293
http://www.videogamesartwork.com/artists/daniel-chavez?page=1

It appears that early in their design, the Hive were heavily influenced by moth imagery and biology. If you look at the concept art (some of which I’ll post here) you’ll see what look like Hive knights with colorful and elaborately detailed armor that is evocative of moth wings.

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Fun Gun Awards: Torque Bow from Gears of War

theron

The Fun Gun Award™, is an award given to video game guns that aren’t necessarily effective, don’t necessarily give a player any tactical advantage, but which do have creative behavior, unique design, and which are fun to use. These guns might suck, but they’re so fun that I want to keep using them.

Last time I talked about the Storm Bow from Heretic 2. Now it’s time to talk about another fun bow.

The Torque Bow is a weird gun to get a Fun Gun Award™, mainly because it’s actually useful.

It’s useful, it’s unique, it’s versatile. It’s kind of an amazingly well designed weapon that can actually stand up to other weapons in Gears of War. And its design has barely changed over the series.
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Destiny Analysis Part 4: The story of Pathways into Darkness in reverse

craig mullins pid
This is part four of four to my analysis of Bungie’s Destiny.

Check out Part 1, where I look at visuals, level design, enemy design, etc.; Part 2: where I look at things like story, weapons, and whether it’s worth buying; and Part 3, where I talk about how things were named in Destiny

I believe that the overarching narrative of Destiny is actually an inverted, or reversed, retelling of the story in Pathways into Darkness, one of Bungie’s very first games. Basically, I think that Destiny is the PiD story told from the perspective of the monsters in PiD, and that the heroes in Pathways into Darkness are the villains in Destiny.

If this is true, then this let’s us make some predictions about the future of Destiny’s overarching story, although not about its gameplay or anything like that.

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Fun Gun Awards: Storm Bow from Heretic 2

storm bow 5

The Fun Gun Award™, is an award for video game guns that aren’t necessarily effective, don’t necessarily give a player a tactical advantage, but which have creative behavior, unique design, and are fun to use. These guns might suck, but they’re so fun that I WANT to learn to use them effectively.

I liked Heretic 2. Probably more than it deserves; or, less than it deserves. I liked the weapons, the visual design, and the plethora of non-human characters and enemies (after the first environment, I don’t think there are any more human enemies). I even liked the silly Ogles in their mountain mines, dancing and shaking their butts every time I saved them.

This was like the sneezing panda video of character animations.

This was like the sneezing panda video of character animations.

I also really liked the Storm Bow, although it wasn’t always that useful.

There is a certain beauty to the literalness of the Storm Bows name. It’s not poetic. It doesn’t shoot a storm of arrows, or do damage equivalent of a storm. It literally shoots a storm at opponents.
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Fun Gun Awards: Bio Rifle from Unreal Tournament

Bio-Rifle

The Fun Gun Award™ is an award for video game guns that aren’t necessarily effective, don’t necessarily give a player a tactical advantage, but which have creative behavior, unique design, and are fun to use. These guns might suck, but they’re so fun that I WANT to learn to use them effectively.

I never played much of the later Unreal Tournaments, so my fondest memories of the Bio Rifle (honorable mention to the Ripper) are from the original Unreal Tournament, way, way back in the ’90s.

When I first starting playing UT I thought the Bio Rifle was completely useless and couldn’t comprehend how it made it into the game.

Years later, it became my favorite gun.
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Destiny Analysis Part 3: Making Names and Giving Ass

new destiny guardians 2

This is part three of four to my analysis of Bungie’s Destiny.

Check out Part 1, where I look at visuals, level design, enemy design, etc.; Part 2: where I look at things like story, weapons, and whether it’s worth buying; and Part 4: where I predict the future of Destiny’s story based on evidence that Destiny is a symbolic retelling of the story from Bungie’s Pathways into Darkness, but from the point of view of the monsters.

So, the way in which things are named is rarely critiqued in video games. Yet I think it’s an aspect that is important.

In Destiny, Bungie drops the ball on how it names… everything. What it amounts to is that the poorly thought out way things are named in Destiny is a microcosm for all the other ways that Bungie dropped the ball with this game.

The way some things are named in Destiny is so bad, I’d expect it from a ten year old, but not from an adult professional, working a nine to five job as a writer for a multi-million dollar video game developer.

Just read on to see what I mean.

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